M.S. Molecular Biosciences


Curriculum

 

Course Descriptions

 

YEAR 1 FALL

 

 

YEAR 1 SPRING

 

Code

Name

Credits

 

Code

Name

Credits

BIO 625

Advanced Molecular Biology

3

 

BIO 650

Research Design/Thesis Proposal

2

ETH 610

Ethics in Research

1

 

BIO 660

Journal Club

1

MAT 610

Statistical Inference and Modeling

3

 

BIO630

Advanced Cell Biology

3

BIO 670

Research Rotation

2

 

XXX

Elective

3

Total Credits

9

 

Total Credits

9

YEAR 2 FALL

 

 

YEAR 2 SPRING

 

Code

Name

Credits

 

Code

Name

Credits

XXX

Elective

3

 

XXX

Elective

3

BIO 701

Thesis Research

3

 

BIO 701

Thesis Research

3

XXX

Elective

3

 

 

 

Total Credits

9

 

Total Credits

6

Printable Version

Year 1 - Fall

Advanced Molecular Biology (BIO 625)
An advanced treatment of genetics in microbial and animal systems, focused on the biochemical and molecular aspects of genetics structure and function. Information derived from current and recent genomic analyses and genomic comparisons will be included. This course will consist of both lectures and small discussion groups that delve more deeply into lecture material and primary scientific literature. (3 credits)

Pre-Requisites: PSC 311/312 or CHE 312/313

Ethics in Research (ETH 610)
This course includes a discussion format based on ethical issues involved in the research process. Students will have focused reading on the ethical issues involved in research and then will apply the readings to case studies during discussion. Topics covered will include, but are not limited to: morality and research ethics, ethical issues before research committees, ethical issues involving human and animal subjects, reporting of research and conflict of interest. (1 credit)

Statistical Inference and Modeling (MAT 610)
This course provides students with a basic knowledge of biostatistics. It includes methods of experimental design and data analysis used to make inference. Topics covered include confidence intervals, hypothesis testing, multivariable regression, generalized linear models, survival models and analysis of variance. The course will also include a component which introduces the students to statistical programming. (3 credits)

Research Rotation (BIO 670)
Students will complete two laboratory rotations of seven weeks each in order to facilitate the selection of a thesis research advisor. Students will select a potential mentor based on interests and availability of openings in any given lab. Assignments, based on student preferences, will be made by the program director. Students are expected to spend a minimum of 10 hours per week on laboratory research during the rotation. They are to meet with the faculty advisor at least one hour per week for basic introduction to laboratory principles and practices, and to discuss their research. Students are required to complete reading assignments as directed by the faculty advisor and write a report of the research data and present a ten minute talk summarizing their research at the end of the rotation. (2 credits)

Year 1 - Spring

Research Design (BIO 650)
This graduate-level course will introduce students to the research methods used in the biological sciences. Topics to be covered include research design, data collection and documentation, critical literature review, preparation of a NIH-style grant application, and academic presentations and publications. Class discussions, workshops, and writing assignments will provide students with opportunities to both practice learned research methods as well as apply these methods toward the design of a potential thesis research project. (2 credits)

Journal Club (BIO 660)
This course is designed to enhance the ability of graduate students to critically evaluate scientific articles published in juried scientific journals. Articles will be selected from current scientific literature in a variety of disciplines in the molecular biosciences, including cell biology, molecular biology, medicinal chemistry biochemistry, microbiology, immunology and infectious diseases. All participants will read and critique the articles. Each student will present at least two articles per semester. (1 credit)

Advanced Cell Biology (BIO 630)
This graduate level course is designed to present foundational principles as well as cutting-edge developments in key areas of eukaryotic cell biology. Focusing on eukaryotic cell structure and function, topics will include: cellular structures and organelles; cell cycling; signal transduction; gene regulation; and intracellular trafficking. This course will consist of both lectures by faculty in their areas of expertise and small discussion groups that delve more deeply into lecture material and primary scientific literature. Students will be expected to demonstrate their knowledge of course material by participation in discussion groups and by examinations. (3 credits)

Pre-Requisites: BIO 101/111, BIO 102/121, BIO 235 recommended

Year 2 - Fall

Thesis Research (Bio 701)
The student will identify an appropriate area of research and a thesis advisor. The student will develop a research proposal. The specific topic and nature of the research will be determined by the student and thesis advisor. On receiving approval from the program director, a thesis committee will be established to act in an advisory capacity for the thesis proposal defense. On successful defense of the proposal the student will commence the research. Studies involving humans must be approved by the College’s IRB. Studies involving animals must be approved by IAUCC. Projects involving data collection and management must adhere to GLP requirements. Once the work has been completed, the student will write and defend the thesis. (1-6 credits)

Year 2 - Spring

Thesis Research (Bio 701)
The student will identify an appropriate area of research and a thesis advisor. The student will develop a research proposal. The specific topic and nature of the research will be determined by the student and thesis advisor. On receiving approval from the program director, a thesis committee will be established to act in an advisory capacity for the thesis proposal defense. On successful defense of the proposal the student will commence the research. Studies involving humans must be approved by the College’s IRB. Studies involving animals must be approved by IAUCC. Projects involving data collection and management must adhere to GLP requirements. Once the work has been completed, the student will write and defend the thesis. (1-6 credits)