Leadership


Provost Patel

Tarun B. Patel
Tarun B. Patel

Provost and Vice President of Academic Affairs

Tarun B. Patel, Ph.D., began as Provost and Vice President of Academic Affairs of Albany College of Pharmacy and Health Sciences on July 1, 2015. In this role, he oversees all areas of the College related to academic programming, research and scholarship, student affairs, and faculty development. Prior to joining ACPHS, Dr. Patel was a Professor in the Department of Molecular Pharmacology and Therapeutics at Loyola University Chicago’s Stritch School of Medicine.

He was recruited by the School of Medicine to be Chair of the Department of Molecular Pharmacology and Therapeutics and served in that role for nearly ten years. He also served as Professor in the Department of Pharmacology at the College of Medicine on the University of Tennessee Health Science Center campus in Memphis, TN.

Read more about Dr. Patel

  • Stefan Balaz, Chair of the Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences on the Vermont Campus
  • David W. Clarke, Dean of the School of Arts and Sciences
  • Brian Cowles, Vice-Chair of the Department of Pharmacy Practice
  • James Gallo, Chair of the Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences
  • Darren Grabe, Chair of the Department of Pharmacy Practice
  • Robert Hamilton, Dean of the School of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences
  • Martha Hass, Dean of Graduate Studies
  • Colleen McLaughlin, Chair of the Department of Population Health Sciences
  • Shaker Mousa, Vice Provost for Research
  • Wendy Neifeld-Wheeler, Dean of Students
  • Tarun Patel, Provost and Vice President of Academic Affairs
  • Michael Pittman, Chair of the Department of Humanities and Communication

    PROVOST'S HONORS CIRCLE

    The Provost's Honors Circle is a three-year interdisciplinary experience for honors students in the College's bachelor of science (B.S.) programs.

    The goal of the program is to provide enrichment opportunities to high-achieving B.S. students who are intellectually curious, well-rounded, engaged with their community, globally-conscious, and exhibit leadership potential.

    Students interested in the Program must fill out an application and interview with members of the Honors Circle Committee. Honors Circle students, who are accepted at the end of their first (freshmen) years, must maintain a class ranking in the top 10% for their remaining three years at the College to remain eligible for the Program.

    Once selected, students meet with faculty mentors in the fall semester of their sophomore years to develop a healthcare related theme that will guide their collective work over the next three years (e.g., vaccines in developing countries). Depending on the project, there may be opportunities for domestic and international travel. Honors students are required to share their experiences, talent, and learning with peers through a colloquium, annual newsletters or blogs, classroom presentations, and volunteer efforts.
     

    PROVOST'S TECHNOLOGY AWARDS

    The Provost Technology Awards align with the College’s strategic goals by supporting the greater use of online teaching and learning for distance education.

    The program encourages instructors who are new to asynchronous or synchronous online learning to develop a hybrid course. 

    For the purposes of the award, this will require converting at least two weeks of face-to-face teaching to an online mode (synchronous or asynchronous) while conducting the rest of the course using the traditional approach. Or, a course with an asynchronous online component could be partly converted to a synchronous approach. 

    The aim is to develop expertise and experience in the different modalities, thereby enabling more instructors to use a hybrid approach.

    2017-18 PROVOST'S TECHNOLOGY AWARD RECIPIENTS
    Katie Cardone
    Katie Cardone, Pharm.D., BCACP

    Project: Rogue One - Putting ‘PTPM Nephrology’ Online

    This project develops PTPM Nephrology for fully online delivery. Through careful design of the online experience, the project aims to (a) develop a flexible learning environment allowing students to access the course from anywhere, (b) expand scheduling options for required coursework within the Pharm.D. Program, and (c) increase the availability of content for pharmacy professionals seeking continuing professional development.

    Darren Grabe
    Darren Grabe, Pharm.D.

    Project: Rogue One - Putting ‘PTPM Nephrology’ Online

    This project develops PTPM Nephrology for fully online delivery. Through careful design of the online experience, the project aims to (a) develop a flexible learning environment allowing students to access the course from anywhere, (b) expand scheduling options for required coursework within the Pharm.D. Program, and (c) increase the availability of content for pharmacy professionals seeking continuing professional development.

    Nicole Shakerley
    Nicole Shakerley, MB (ASCP), Ph.D.

    Project: Fully Online Research Design Course

    BIO650: Research Design is a writing intensive course that enrolls a diverse cohort of graduate students with differing levels of research background and writing skills. Drawing from the benefits of the asynchronous online environment, this project focuses on developing an online course that provides differentiated instruction so that material can be better tailored to the various needs and skill levels of all learners. 

    Binshan Shi
    Binshan Shi, Ph.D.

    Project: Enhance Student Clinical Practice Experience by Implementation of an Online Course - Genetics and Molecular Basis of Diseases

    The purpose of this project is to develop BHS740 for online delivery to better serve CLS students while they are at clinical rotation sites. The delivery format reduces schedule conflicts and enhances the student experience through the use of active and engaging online instructional techniques. The project also creates an opportunity to develop online continuing education programs for clinical molecular biologists.

    Eric Yager
    Eric Yager, Ph.D.

    Project: Fully Online Immersive and Gamified Course in Virology

     

    Using game-design and mechanics, students will complete modules designed to train them as virologists while trying to solve the identity of the virus responsible for a fictitious outbreak threatening the campus and surrounding area. The course will implement the badging feature in Blackboard to help students gauge their progress with immediate feedback while working toward the culminating activity of the course.

    In addition to designing and developing online courses, all awardees complete training for online course development, work in consultation with an instructional designer in the Center for Innovative Learning, and participate in the Instructional Design Showcase. These faculty members’ commitment to building high quality online courses is commendable as their work will help establish practices that reflect the institutional commitment to offering high quality, student-centered programs that teach 21st century skills and meet the changing needs of employers and the health professions.